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Traumatic Thrombosis of the Internal Carotid Artery: Two Cases by Different Pathogenesis

  • Francesco De Ferrari
  • Mariagrazia Birbes
  • Mario Restori
Conference paper

Abstract

The thrombosis of the carotid artery resulting from non-penetrating trauma is a not frequent, but well known event and it has been reported in the literature since a long time (Clarke et al. 1955, Yamada et al. 1967, Fleming et al. 1968, Gurdjian et al. 1971). Crissey and Bernstein (1974) described four pathogenetic mechanisms of the thrombosis: 1) a direct blow to the neck, 2) a blow to the side of the head resulting in hyperextension and rotation of the head with stretching of the carotid artery and consequent rupture of the intima, 3) an intraoral blunt trauma, 4) basal or other skull fractures that can damage the intrapetrous portion of the internal carotid artery.

Keywords

Carotid Artery Internal Carotid Artery Pathogenetic Mechanism Carotid Artery Occlusion Neck Trauma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesco De Ferrari
    • 1
  • Mariagrazia Birbes
    • 1
  • Mario Restori
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Forensic MedicineUniversity of BresciaBresciaItaly

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