Usefulness of D1S80 System in Paternity Investigation

  • Danuta Miścicka-Śliwka
  • Karol Śliwka
  • Anna Syroczyńska
  • Jaroslaw A. Berent
Conference paper

Abstract

Before the developement of DNA polymorphism the most cases of disputed paternity were solved by testing blood groups, serum proteins, erythrocyte enzymes and additionally HLA. Nevertheless in cases of only one system exclusion, especially homozygotic ones, or silent genes the further extension of surveys, family investigations or finally investigation of the enzyme activity has been required. Those cases have been suggested by some authors to be resolved using the DNA technique [4,7,8,10]. Since Nakamura et al. [9] had reported the polymorphic region — VNTR locus D1S80 and Kasai et al. [3] had sequenced it the new approach caused by the introduction of D1S80 into disputed paternity investigation has been used.

Key words

DNA VNTR D1S80 paternity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Danuta Miścicka-Śliwka
    • 1
  • Karol Śliwka
    • 1
  • Anna Syroczyńska
    • 1
  • Jaroslaw A. Berent
    • 1
  1. 1.Forensic Medicine InstituteThe Ludwik Rydygier’s University School of MedicalBydgoszczPoland

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