Holograph versus maximum-intensity projection display of neurovascular anatomy and pathology

  • J. Hunter
  • C. Ogilvy
  • R. Schulz
  • G. Geil
  • L. Lustrin
  • A. Wolfe
  • J. Taveras
Conference paper

Abstract

We compared the commonly used maximum-intensity projection (MIP) algorithm for extracting information for three-dimensional (3D) rendering with a holographic technique for true 3D volume display. The holographic technique uses all the data generated by magnetic resonance angiography, whereas MIP selects only certain data to create a rendering.

Key words

Holography Maximum-intensity projection 

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References

  1. 1.
    Brown DG, Riederer SJ (1992) Contrast-to-noise ratios in maximum intensity projection images. Magn Reson Med 23: 130–137.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Anderson CM, Saloner D, Tsuruda JS, Shapeero LG, Lee RE (1990) Artifacts in maximum-intensity-projection display of MR angiograms. AJR 154: 623–629.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Blatter DD, Parker DL, Robinson RO (1991) Cerebral MR angiography with multiple overlapping thin slab acquisition, part 1. Quantitative analysis of vessel visibility. Radiology 179: 805–810.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Hunter
    • 1
  • C. Ogilvy
    • 1
  • R. Schulz
    • 1
  • G. Geil
    • 1
  • L. Lustrin
    • 1
  • A. Wolfe
    • 1
  • J. Taveras
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Neuroradiology and NeurosurgeryMassachusetts General HospitalVoxelUSA

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