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Oedema fluid clearance within cerebral contusion studied by MRI

  • H. Kushi
  • M. Fujii
  • T. Shibuya
  • Y. Katayama
  • T. Tsubokawa
Conference paper

Abstract

Peripheral oedema associated with cerebral contusion is life-threatening in severe head injury. The present study was conducted to make clear the time sequence of development of post-traumatic vascular permeability using gadolinium (Cd)-DTPA-enhanced MRI. We examined 10 patients with traumatic cerebral contusion (mean age 38 years; 8 men and 2 women) with Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI 1-3 days after head trauma. Gad-olium-DTPA (0.3mmol/Kg) was administered by intravenous drip infusion for 30 min. MRI was performed before, and 2 and 4 h after infusion. The contusional oedema area frequently enhanced with Gd-DTPA 2 h after infusion. After 4 h, the enhancement had already begun to decrease. These findings suggest that increased vascular permeability in the very acute phase of head injury may contribute in part to the formation of contusional oedema and that the oedema fluid clearance within cerebral contusion is more rapid than previously thought.

key words

Cerebral contusion Vasogenic oedema Magnetic resonance imaging Gadolinium-DTPA enhancement 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kushi
    • 1
  • M. Fujii
    • 1
  • T. Shibuya
    • 1
  • Y. Katayama
    • 1
  • T. Tsubokawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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