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Pilze in der Agrobiotechnologie

  • M. Wainwright
Part of the Biotechnologie book series (BIOTECH)

Zusammenfassung

Noch werden Pilze in der Agrobiotechnologie selten eingesetzt. Nur das SCP-Verfahren zur Produktion von Tierfutter arbeitet mit Pilzen. In sehr seltenen Fällen wird der Boden mit Fermentationsrückständen verbessert oder gedüngt.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Wainwright
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biology and BiotechnologyUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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