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Intraductal Breast Carcinoma: Experiences from The Breast Center in Van Nuys, California

  • M. J. Silverstein
  • D. N. Poller
  • A. Barth
  • J. R. Waisman
  • J. A. Jensen
  • R. Masetti
  • E. D. Gierson
  • W. J. Colburn
  • B. S. Lewinsky
  • S. L. Auerbach
  • P. Gamagami
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 140)

Abstract

The Breast Center in Van Nuys, California was the first free-standing, truly multidisciplinary, breast treatment center in the United States (Silverstein et al. 1986a). Housed in a 14000 square foot area, it includes a home-like waiting room, an operating and recovery suite, diagnostic and education center, clinical center, physicians offices, and psychiatric center. Members of the diagnostic and therapeutic teams are always available. The diagnostic center contains four modern mammography machines, a digital stereotactic unit, and ultrasonography equipment. The staff includes surgical, medical and radiation oncologists, a diagnostic radiologist, two reconstructive surgeons, two pathologists and a psychologic team headed by a psychiatrist (psycho-oncologist).

Keywords

Nuclear Grade High Nuclear Grade National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Autologous Tissue Reconstruction Intraductal Breast Carcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Silverstein
    • 1
  • D. N. Poller
    • 2
  • A. Barth
    • 3
  • J. R. Waisman
    • 3
  • J. A. Jensen
    • 4
  • R. Masetti
    • 1
  • E. D. Gierson
    • 1
  • W. J. Colburn
    • 2
  • B. S. Lewinsky
    • 5
  • S. L. Auerbach
    • 6
  • P. Gamagami
    • 7
  1. 1.Division of Surgical OncologyThe Breast CenterVan NuysUSA
  2. 2.Division of PathologyThe Breast CenterVan NuysUSA
  3. 3.Division of Medical OncologyThe Breast CenterVan NuysUSA
  4. 4.Division of Plastic SurgeryThe Breast CenterVan NuysUSA
  5. 5.Division of Radiation OncologyThe Breast CenterVan NuysUSA
  6. 6.Fellow in Breast DiseaseThe Breast CenterVan NuysUSA
  7. 7.Division of Breast Imaging (Radiology)The Breast CenterVan NuysUSA

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