Vascular Physiology and Pathophysiology of Early Pregnancy

  • J. Hustin

Abstract

The period which begins at implantation and ends at the completion of embryonic organogenesis is described as early pregnancy. During these 10–12 weeks the conceptus, i.e. the embryo and its adnexae, is completely buried within the maternal decidua. Contrary to classical theories, it appears that for a substantial period, relations between mother and embryo are limited. There are reasons to believe that a precise equilibrium of local vascular physiology is of paramount importance for the maintenance of a successful pregnancy. Pregnancy is characterized by continuous changes in the volume and weight of the uterus and its contents. Therefore, its blood supply is also modified. It is logical to postulate that local vascular physiology is subject to constant adaptations. These must, however, occur at the right time; failure to do so may lead to pregnancy loss. The first part of this chapter describes the decidual circulation, and the second part, embryonic circulation and some pathophysiological aspects of early human pregnancy.

Keywords

Manifold Barium Hematoxylin Eosin Benz 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

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  • J. Hustin

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