Risk Assessment

  • K. Schlüter
Part of the Springer Lab Manual book series (SLM)

Abstract

The rapid advances in plant transformation techniques lead to a permanent acceleration in the development of new transgenic plants and therefore to a growing number of releases. Many genetically manipulated plants (GMPs) are designed for use in agriculture and industrial production and will be set free in commercial scale. Concerns on possible ecological impacts caused by field releases have arisen in the public as well as in the scientific community. For this reason, guidelines have been established laying down risk/safety analysesfor GMPs. In general, such an analysis involves two steps: (1) hazard identification and (2) risk assessment (OECD 1993). The factors causing the potential adverse effects are identified and their probability is estimated. The scientific basis for a risk assessment has to be provided by biosafety experiments. The experimental results point out whether additional safety precautions are necessary for future commercial releases. Only in this way will an appropriate risk management be possible. The quality of a risk assessment always depends on the respective biosafety experiments and the interpretation of the results in the context of the special experimental design.

Keywords

Biomass Sugar Toxicity Maize Dust 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

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  • K. Schlüter

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