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A Comparison of Epicuticular Wax of Pinus sylvestris Needles from Three Sites in Ireland

  • Alison Donnelly
  • Paul Dowding
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 36)

Abstract

Three forest stands of Pinus sylvestris were chosen for comparison in Ireland. Needles from three year classes were collected. Cuticular transpiration curves showed that the rate of water loss from 1-year-old needles was faster than either 2-year-old or current-year needles at all sites. The amount of epicuticular wax extracted was similar to that reported in the literature. Needle wettability increased with needle age. Amorphous wax coverage was estimated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and was found to increase with needle age. Algal cells were noted on needles of all ages at one site and appeared to affect transpiration and microroughness. The presence of fungal hyphae was also noted.

Keywords

Contact Angle Algal Cell Fungal Hypha Abaxial Surface Adaxial Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alison Donnelly
    • 1
  • Paul Dowding
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Science UnitTrinity College DublinIreland

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