Laboratory Kinetics at Low Temperature

  • Georges Le Bras
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 21)

Abstract

One of the approaches for understanding the atmospheric chemistry and to predict the chemical change of the composition of the earth atmosphere is to model the system using as the input parameters the photochemical and chemical reactions rates determined in the laboratory.

Keywords

Combustion Methane Microwave Sulfide Hydroxyl 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Atkinson R (1989) Kinetics and mechanisms of the gas phase reactions of the hydroxyl radical with organic compounds, J. Phys. Chem. Ref Data, Monograph 1Google Scholar
  2. Brown AC, Canosa-mas CE, Parr AD, Wayne RP (1990) Laboratory studies of some halogenated ethanes and ethers: measurements of rates of reaction with OH and of infrared absorption cross-sections, Atmos.Environ. 24A: 2499–2511Google Scholar
  3. Connell PS, Howard CJ (1985) Kinetic study of the OH + HNO3 reaction, Int. J. Chem. Kinetics 17: 17–31CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. De More WB, Golden DM, Hampson RF, Kurylo MJ, Howard CJ, Ravishankara AR, Kolb CE, Molina MJ (1992) Chemical kinetics and photochemical data for use in stratospheric modelling, JPL Publication 92–20Google Scholar
  5. Friedl RR, Sander SP (1989) Kinetics and products of the reaction C1O + BrO using discharge-flow mass spectrometry, J. Phys. Chem. 93: 4756–4764CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hynes AJ, Wine PH, Nicovich JM (1988) Kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of OH with CS2 under atmospheric conditions, J. Phys. Chem. 92: 3846–3852CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hynes AJ, Wine PH, Semmes DH (1986) Kinetics and mechanism of OH reactions with organic sulfides, J. Phys. Chem. 90: 4148–4156CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Kircher CC, Margitan JJ, Sander SP (1984) Pressure and temperature dependence of the reaction NO2 + NO3 + M → N2O5 + M, J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4370–4375CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Margitan JJ, Watson RT (1982) Kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric aC1d, J. Phys. Chem. 86: 3819–3824CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Maudlin III RL, Wahner A, Ravishankara AR (1993) Kinetics and mechanism of the selfreaction of the BrO radical, J. Phys. Chem. 97: 7585–7596CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Sander SP, Friedl RR (1989) Kinetics and product studies of the reaction C1O + BrO using flash photolysis - ultraviolet absorption, J. Phys. Chem. 93: 4764–4771CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Sander SP, Friedl RR, Yung YL (1989) Rate of formation of the C1O dimer in the polar stratosphere: implications for ozone loss, Science 245: 1095–1098CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Stickel RE, Nicovich JM, Wang S, Zhao Z, Wine PH (1992) Kinetic and mechanistic study of the reaction of atomic chlorine and dimethylsulfide, J. Phys. Chem. 96: 9875–9883CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Stimpfle RM, Perry RA, Howard CJ (1979) Temperature dependence of the reaction of C1O and HO2 radicals, J. Chem. Phys. 71: 5183–5190CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Talukdar RK, Msllouki A, Schmoltner AM, Watson T, Moutzka S, Ravishankara AR (1992) Kinetics of the OH reaction with 1,1,1 - trichloroetane and its atmospheric implications, Science 257: 227–230CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Turnipseed AA, Barone SB, Ravishankara AR (1993), Observation of CH3S addition to O2 in the gas phase, J. Phys. Chem. 96: 7502–7505CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Vaghjiani GL, Ravishankara AR (1991) New measurements of the rate coeffiC1ent for the reaction of OH with methane, Nature 350: 406–409CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Zhang Z, Huie RE, Kurylo MJ (1992) Rate constants for the reactions of OH with CH3CFCl2, CH3CF2C1, and CH2FCF3, J. Phys. Chem. 96: 1533–1535CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georges Le Bras
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Combustion et Systèmes RéactifsOrléans Cedex 2France

Personalised recommendations