Photochemistry in and on Low Temperature Solid Materials

  • John R. Sodeau
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 21)

Abstract

The undoubted importance of homogeneous, gas phase reactions in the atmosphere has driven the production of an exhaustive data bank of room temperature kinetic and spectroscopic information. Many of the results obtained are readily interpretable in terms of a chemical mechanism and have been included, with confidence, in atmospheric models. However, such models are now accepted to be incomplete because they were not able to predict the appearance of an “ozone hole” over Antarctica. To obtain a more comprehensive picture, experimentalists have found that they must direct some attention to the study of heterogeneous chemistry especially that associated with Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). This new perspective has taken on even more importance recently because chlorine processing on sulphate aerosol particles is now thought to contribute to global ozone depletion.

Keywords

Formaldehyde Cage Argon Recombination Aldehyde 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abouaf-Marguin L, Jacox ME, Milligan DE (1977) The rotation and inversion of normal and deuterated ammonia in inert matrices. J. Mol Spectr 67: 34–61CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Barnes AJ, Orville-Thomas WJ, Muller A, Gaufres R (eds) (1981) Matrix isolation spectroscopy. NATO ASI Series. D.Reidel Publishing Co., HollandGoogle Scholar
  3. Clemitshaw KC, Sodeau JR (1987) Atmospheric chemistry at 4.2 K: a matrix isolation study of the reaction between CF3OO radicals and NO. J Phys Chem 91: 3650–3653CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Clemitshaw KC, Sodeau JR (1988) Proximity radicals in low temperature matrices. J Phys Chem 92: 5491–5497CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Crowley JN, Sodeau JR (1987) Reaction between nitric oxide and the amidogen radical. J Phys Chem 91: 2024–2026CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Crowley JN, Sodeau JR (1990) Production and detection of nitrosamide in low temperature matrices. J Phys Chem 94: 8103–8105CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Diem M, Lee EKC (1979) The role of the cage dimer of formaldehyde in the photolysis of formaldehyde/argon matrices at 12 K. Chem Phys 41: 373–377CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Fitzmaurice DJ, Frei H (1992) Photoinduced oxygen transfer from NO2 to ethene. J Phys Chem 96: 10308–10315CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Frei H, Blatter F (1993) Visible-light induced photochemistry of 2,3-dimethyl-2- butene/N2O4. J Phys Chem 97: 1178–1183CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Hallam HE (ed) (1973) Vibrational spectroscopy of trapped species. Wiley. EnglandGoogle Scholar
  11. Hawkins M, Downs AJ (1984) Photochemistry of argon matrices containing NO and COS. J Phys Chem 88: 1527–1533CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Jacox ME (1984) Ground-state vibrational energy levels of polyatomic transient molecules. J. Phys Chem Ref Data 13: 945–1067CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Johnston HS, Chang S-G, Whitten G (1974) Photolysis of nitric acid vapour. J Phys Chem 78: 1–7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Jolly GS, Singleton DL McKenney DJ, Paraskevopoulos G (1986) Laser photolysis of HNO3 at 222 nm. Direct determination of the primary quantum yield of OH. J Chem Phys 84: 6662–6667CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Koch T, Sodeau JR (unpublished results)Google Scholar
  16. Lee Y-P, Cheng B-M, Lee J-W (1991) Photolysis of nitric acid in solid argon; the infrared absorption of peroxynitrous acid ( HOONO ). J Phys Chem 95: 2814–2817Google Scholar
  17. Lesclaux R, Dognon AM, Caralp F (1985) Reactions of chloromethylperoxyl radicals with NO. J. Chim Phys Phys-Chim Biol 82: 349–355Google Scholar
  18. McKee ML (1986) Ab initio study of rearrangements on the CH3NO2 potential energy surface. J Am Chem Soc 108: 5784–5792CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Nelander B, Johnsson K, Engdahl, Ouis P (1992) A matrix isolation study of the water complexes of C12, C1OC1, OC1O and HOC1. J Phys Chem 96: 5778–5783CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Nieminen J, Rasanen M, Murto J (1992) Matrix isolation and ab initio studies of oxalic acid. J Phys Chem 96: 5303–5308CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Niki H (1993) Proceedings of STEP-Halocside Workshop, UCD Dublin. CEC Air Pollution Research ReportGoogle Scholar
  22. Ogden JS (1981) In: Barnes AJ et al (eds) Matrix isolation spectroscopy. NATO ASI Series. D.Reidel Publishing Co., Holland. 207–230Google Scholar
  23. Pilling MJ, Lightfoot PD, Baggot JE, Kirwan SP (1988) Photolysis of acetone at 193.3 nm. J Phys Chem 92: 4938–4946CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Polanyi JC, Bourdon EBD, Das P, Harrison I, Segner J, Stanners CD, Williams RJ, Young PA (1986) Photodissociation, photoreaction and photodesorption of adsorbed species. Faraday Discuss Chem Soc 82: 343–358CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Ravishankara AR, Turnipseed AA, Vaghjiani GL, Thompson JE (1992) Photodissociation of HNO3 at 193, 222 and 248 nm: products and quantum yields. J Chem Phys 96: 5887–5895CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Richardson HH (1992) Infrared spectroscopy and photochemistry of acetone adsorbed on NaCl films. J Phys Chem 96: 5898–5902CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Schiffman A, Nelson DD, Nesbitt DJ (1993) Quantum yields for OH production from 193 and 248 nm photolysis of HNO3 and H2O2- J Chem Phys 98: 6935–6946Google Scholar
  28. Schriver L, De Saxce A (1992) An infrared study of the UV photolysis of chlorine nitrate trapped in various matrices at 11K. Chem Phys Lett 199: 596–604CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Shibuya K Tanaka N, Kajii Y, Nakata M (1993) Visible light induced reactions of NO2 with conjugated dienes in a low-temperature Ar matrix. J Phys Chem 97: 7048–7053CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Sodeau JR, Lee EKC (1978) Intermediacy of hydroxymethylene in the low temperature matrix photochemistry of formaldehyde. Chem Phys Lett 57: 71–74CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Sodeau JR, Lee EKC (1980) Photooxidation of sulfur dioxide in low temperature matrices. J Phys Chem 84: 3358–3362CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Sodeau JR, Withnall R (1985) Proximity effects in low-temperature matrices. J. Phys Chem 89: 4484–4488CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Sodeau
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Chemical SciencesUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK

Personalised recommendations