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Atmospheric Chemistry: Introduction

  • Richard P. Wayne
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 21)

Abstract

Our knowledge of the atmospheres of Earth and the planets has increased dramatically over the last three decades. Two factors have contributed to making atmospheric chemistry a major area of interest and research. Exploration of atmospheres, first our own, then those of other bodies in the solar system, has been made possible by the imaginative rocket and satellite programmes, and detailed information has emerged about the chemical composition of these atmospheres. At the same time, Man has become aware (Logan et al., 1978) that the results of many of his activities could have damaging effects on the chemical balance of the atmosphere, and perhaps lead even to significant global climatic change. Combustion of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide, and combustion at high temperatures produces oxides of nitrogen; sulphur compounds may also be released. Biomass burning, use of fertilizers, and agricultural practice generally adds to the burden of anthropogenic compounds in the atmosphere, while manufactured compounds such as the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) provide yet further challenges to the atmospheric chemical system.

Keywords

Ozone Layer Atmospheric Chemistry Solar Zenith Angle Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Radiation Trapping 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Further reading

  1. For this introductory chapter, only a few topics require specific bibliographical references (see below). Most of the material is more conveniently covered by some selected suggestions for further reading, which are presented hereGoogle Scholar
  2. Brasseur G, Solomon S (1986) Aeronomy of the middle atmosphere: chemistry and physics in the stratosphere and mesosphere ( second edition ), D. Reidel, DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  3. Finlayson-Pitts BJ, Pitts JN, Jr. (1986) Atmospheric chemistry, John Wiley, ChichesterGoogle Scholar
  4. Graedel TE, Crutzen PJ (1993) Atmospheric change, Freeman, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. Johnston HS (1992) Atmospheric ozone. Ann Rev Phys Chem 43: 1–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kirchner JW (1989) The Gaia hypothesis: can it be tested? Rev Geophys 27: 223–235CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Lovelock JE (1979) Gaia: a new look at life on earth, Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  8. Mason BJ (1989) The greenhouse effect. Contemp Phys 30: 417–432CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Seinfeld JL (1986) Atmospheric chemistry and physics of air pollution, John Wiley, ChichesterGoogle Scholar
  10. Thrush BA (1988) The chemistry of the stratosphere, Rev Prog Phys 51: 1341–1371CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Warneck P (1988) Chemistry of the natural atmosphere, Academic Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  12. Wayne RP (1991) Chemistry of atmospheres, 2nd edn. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar

References

  1. Chapman S (1930) A theory of upper-atmosphere ozone. Mem Roy Meteorol Soc 3: 103–125Google Scholar
  2. Graedel TE, Crutzen PJ (1989) The changing atmosphere. Scient Am 261: 28–36 (September)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Kirchner JW (1989) The Gaia hypothesis: can it be tested? Rev Geophys 27: 223–235CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Logan JA, Prather M, Wofsy SC, McElroy MB (1978) Atmospheric chemistry: response to human influence. Phil Trans Roy Soc A290: 187–234CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Lovelock JE (1979) Gaia: a new look at life on earth, Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  6. Prinn RG, Fegley B, Jr. (1987) The atmospheres of Venus, Earth and Mars: a critical comparison, Ann Rev Planet Space Sci 15: 171–212CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Rowland FS, Isaksen ISA (eds) (1988) The changing atmosphere, John Wiley, ChichesterGoogle Scholar
  8. Wayne RP (1991) Chemistry of atmospheres, 2nd edn. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard P. Wayne
    • 1
  1. 1.Physical Chemistry LaboratoryUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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