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Time-Lapse Video Light Microscopic and Electron Microscopic Observations of Vertebrate Epithelial Cells Exposed to Crocidolite Asbestos

  • C. G. Jensen
  • L. C. W. Jensen
  • J. G. Ault
  • G. Osorio
  • R. Cole
  • C. L. Rieder
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 85)

Abstract

The most popular hypothesis for how asbestos transforms cells is based on its physical dimensions, not its chemistry. This view is derived from the finding that the cytotoxic effects and transforming ability of various mineral fibers are related primarily to fiber dimensions (i.e., the length/width aspect ratio — See Hesterberg and Barrett, 1984; Stanton et al 1981; reviewed in Harington, 1981). For this reason, a knowledge of how mineral fibers behave within interphase and dividing cells, and with what intracellular components they interact, becomes important in elucidating the mechanism(s) by which they cause cell injury.

Keywords

Acridine Orange Asbestos Fiber Mineral Fiber Cytoplasmic Microtubule Surrounding Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. G. Jensen
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. C. W. Jensen
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. G. Ault
    • 1
  • G. Osorio
    • 1
  • R. Cole
    • 1
  • C. L. Rieder
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and ResearchNew York State Department of HealthAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  3. 3.Department of Biomedical SciencesState University of New YorkAlbanyUSA

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