Features of an Integrated 3D Computer Approach

  • Simon W. Houlding

Overview

We have reviewed the requirements of geological characterization, the factors that complicate computerization of the process, and the various computer techniques that have evolved from applications in the different geoscience sectors. The principal data sources, data flow, data structures and operations involved in the computerized process are illustrated schematically in Fig. 3.1. This chapter is devoted to summarizing the principal features of a computerized approach that meets the identified requirements and addresses the complications.

Keywords

Clay Porosity Migration Anisotropy Sandstone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon W. Houlding
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.BurnabyCanada
  2. 2.LYNX Geosystems Inc.VancouverCanada

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