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Microbial Mats pp 125-130 | Cite as

Osmotic adaptation of microbial communities in hypersaline microbial mats

  • Aharon Oren
  • Uri Fischel
  • Zeev Aizenshtat
  • Eitan B. Krein
  • Robert H. Reed
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 35)

Abstract

Microorganisms that live in hypersaline environments need to maintain a high osmotic pressure in their cytoplasm to balance the osmotic pressure caused by the high salt concentrations. Most halophilic and halotolerant eubacteria and eukaryotic protists exclude salt, and synthesize or accumulate high concentrations of organic solutes that do not interfere with intracellular enzymatic activities (“osmotic solutes” or “compatible solutes”).

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatography Compatible Solute Glycine Betaine Hypersaline Environment Osmotic Solute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aharon Oren
    • 1
    • 2
  • Uri Fischel
    • 1
  • Zeev Aizenshtat
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Eitan B. Krein
    • 1
    • 3
  • Robert H. Reed
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of Life SciencesThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.The Moshe Shilo Center for Marine BiogeochemistryUSA
  3. 3.Institute of ChemistryThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael
  4. 4.Department of Chemical and Life SciencesUniversity of Northumbria at NewcastleNewcastle upon TyneUK

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