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Plant Functional Diversity and Resource Control of Primary Production in Alaskan Arctic Tundras

  • G. R. Shaver
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 113)

Abstract

The arctic tundra is an ecosystem type in which both vegetation composition and primary production are strongly limited by an extreme physical environment, including limitation by low temperatures, low light, a short growing season, and extremes of soil moisture (Billings and Mooney 1968; Bliss et al. 1981; Chapin and Shaver 1985; Chapin et al. 1992). In this physically stressful environment, both nutritional and biotic resources like soil-available nutrients or pollinators are also in short supply and thus contribute to its overall stressfulness. Finally, arctic tundras are frequently and extensively disturbed by freeze and thaw processes, and thus both the environment and the vegetation are continually changing on a fine scale even though on a coarse scale they may appear to be relatively stable (Sigafoos 1952; Churchill and Hanson 1958; Bliss and Peterson 1992).

Keywords

Community Productivity Arctic Tundra Arctic Ecosystem Resource Uptake Eriophorum Vaginatum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Shaver
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine Biological LaboratoryThe Ecosystems CenterWoods HoleUSA

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