Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH) in Cytogenetical Studies

  • A. T. Natarajan
  • S. Vermeulen
  • M. Grigorova
  • J. J. W. A. Boei
  • E. T. Sakamoto Hojo
  • H. J. Oh
  • F. Darroudi

Abstract

Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using non-radioactive probes has become an important tool in cytogenetics. With this technique, using chromosome specific DNA libraries, one can paint whole chromosomes, or using specific probes it is possible to hybridize with specific regions of the chromosome, such as telomeres, centromeres etc. This technique has been used extensively in our laboratory to study several cytogenetical end points in genetic toxicology.

Keywords

Anemia Half Life International Atomic Energy Agency Toxicology Cytochalasin 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. T. Natarajan
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Vermeulen
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Grigorova
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. J. W. A. Boei
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. T. Sakamoto Hojo
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. J. Oh
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Darroudi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.MGC Department of Radiation Genetics and Chemical MutagenesisState University of LeidenLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.J. A. Cohen InstituteInter University Institute for Radiation Protection & RadiopathologyLeidenThe Netherlands

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