Ecosystem Function of Biodiversity: Can We Learn From the Collective Experience of MTE Research?

  • G. W. Davis
  • M. C. Rutherford
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 109)

Abstract

The central problem tackled in this Volume involves separating the consequences of biodiversity from all other system relations and attributes. It is a question which impinges on both theoretical ecology, and the application of ecological knowledge to maintenance of the human environment (Fig. 7.1). The mediterranean-type ecosystem (MTE) project is part of a far-reaching initiative formulated within the IUBS-SCOPE-UNESCO Programme on Ecosystem Function of Biodiversity (see Preface; Fig. 7.2), and has the broad mandate to address the following questions:
  • “How is system stability and resistance affected by species diversity, and how will global change affect these relationships?

  • What is the role of biodiversity in ecosystem processes, including feedbacks, over short and long term spans, and in the face of global change?” (Younés 1992).

Keywords

Corn Marketing Charcoal Hunt Arena 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. W. Davis
  • M. C. Rutherford

There are no affiliations available

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