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Determinants of mRNA Stability in Higher Plants

  • Crispin B. Taylor
  • Thomas C. Newman
  • Masaru Ohme-Takagi
  • Pauline A. Bariola
  • André B. Dandridge
  • Pamela J. Green
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 81)

Abstract

In eukaryotes, each of the steps between transcription of a gene and degradation of the corresponding protein are potential targets for regulation of expression. Of these, transcriptional control mechanisms are the best understood, both from the perspective of basic components of the transcriptional apparatus, and with respect to the mechanisms that regulate specific genes or sets of genes. However, it has become apparent that many eukaryotic genes are controlled to some extent by posttranscriptional events (Peltz et al., 1991). The contribution of mRNA processing, transport, and stability, and of translational and post-translational mechanisms to the regulation of gene expression has therefore received increasing attention recently. Of these, regulation at the level of mRNA stability is among the most widely evoked, but the mechanisms by which such control is exerted remain poorly understood.

Keywords

RNase Activity RNase Gene Momordica Charantia Soybean Hypocotyl Instability Sequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Crispin B. Taylor
    • 1
  • Thomas C. Newman
    • 1
  • Masaru Ohme-Takagi
    • 1
  • Pauline A. Bariola
    • 1
  • André B. Dandridge
    • 1
  • Pamela J. Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Energy Plant Research LaboratoryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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