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Shock Waves in the Cavity of a Xe-He Excimer Laser

  • S. Kosugi
  • T. Ohishi
  • K. Maeno
  • H. Honma
Conference paper

Abstract

Shock waves, which are generated by pulse discharges in an excimer laser, cause arcing and nonhomogeneous excitation in the laser cavity. Experiments and numerical calculations are conducted to clarify the generation and propagation of shock waves in the cavity of an excimer laser. The shock Waves are visualized by using a CCD color Schlieren method. Numerical calculations using Yee’s symmetric TVD scheme are carried out for conditions which correspond to the experiments. The initial conditions of the calculations are determined from measured results with the laser Schlieren method, and from Schlieren photographs. Color Schlieren photographs are constructed from the numerical results. The numerical Schlieren photographs are found to be in good agreements with the experimental Schlieren photographs.

Key words

Shock wave Flow visualization Color Schlieren Electric discharge Excimer laser 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Kosugi
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Ohishi
    • 1
  • K. Maeno
    • 2
  • H. Honma
    • 2
  1. 1.Heavy Apparatus Eng. Lab.Toshiba Corp.Tsurumi-ku, YokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Dept. of Mech. Eng., Fac. of Eng.Chiba Univ.Inage-ku, ChibaJapan

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