DNA Analysis of Human Blood Recovered from Explosion Debris

  • P. T. Bilous
  • R. J. Goulden
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Forensic Haemogenetics book series (HAEMOGENETICS, volume 5)

Abstract

A detailed study was initiated into natural gas migration in a residence and the effects of a natural gas explosion on both physical and biological trace evidence. Personnel from several Provincial and Federal agencies participated in this study 1. The biological portion consisted of two experiments: 1. To determine if a simulated homicide scene could be recreated from blood spatter evidence recovered from the explosion debris. 2. To determine the effects of a brief, but high temperature, natural gas explosion on the ability to obtain reliable DNA typing results from exposed bloodstains.

Keywords

Cellulose Migration Transportation Agarose Bromide 

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References

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    Participants: Edmonton, Calgary and County of Parkland Fire Departments; Northwestern Gas Utility Ltd; Edmonton Police Service; RCMP Forensic Laboratory, Edmonton; RCMP Canadian Bomb Data Centre; Transportation Safety Board of Canada;Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    S.J. Sambrook, E.F. Fritsch, and T. Maniatis. 1989. Molecular Cloning - A Laboratory Manual, 2nd edition, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.Google Scholar
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    J.S. Waye, L.A. Presley, B. Budowle, G.G. Shutler, and R.M. Fourney. 1989. Biotechniques 7: 852–855.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    For a match to occur between two DNA profiles, all corresponding DNA bands must visually match, and their estimated lengths must be within a match window of ± 2.6% of their mean size (RCMP DNA Analysis Protocol).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. T. Bilous
    • 1
  • R. J. Goulden
    • 1
  1. 1.Royal Canadian Mounted Police Forensic LaboratoryEdmontonCanada

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