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Use of Chemiluminescent Labeled Probes for Forensic and Paternity Determinations

  • M. Baird
  • L. Galbreath
  • R. Cunningham
  • J. Lastella
  • I. Balazs
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Forensic Haemogenetics book series (HAEMOGENETICS, volume 5)

Abstract

Since the middle 1980’s, issues involving human identification in forensic or paternity cases have been addressed by RFLP DNA analysis using probes radiolabeled with P32 (Kanter et al., 1986; Guisti et al., 1986; Baird et al., 1986). The main disadvantage of these types of probes are their short shelf life and the general inconvenience associated with working with radioactive materials. For the past several years our laboratory has been involved in the conversion of these probes to a non-isotopic format. This has been accomplished through the development of oligonucleotide probes labeled with alkaline phosphatase (AP-probe) that recognize VNTR loci (Baum et al. 1990, Neuweiler et al. 1992). The final detection of AP-probes is based on the detection of chemiluminescence with the substrate, adamantyl 1,2-dioxetane phenyl phosphate (LumiphosTM). This detection system offers equivalent sensitivity to P32 allowing detection of genomic DNA in the ng range.

Keywords

Radioactive Material Restriction Fragment Length Polymorph Phenyl Phosphate Equivalent Sensitivity Short Shelf Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Baird
    • 1
  • L. Galbreath
    • 1
  • R. Cunningham
    • 1
  • J. Lastella
    • 1
  • I. Balazs
    • 1
  1. 1.Lifecodes CorporationStamfordUSA

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