Phenotype and Allele Frequencies of 4 VNTR-AMPFLP’s in an Austrian Population Sample

  • D. W. M. Schwartz
  • E. M. Jungl
  • O. R. Krenek
  • W. R. Mayr
Part of the Advances in Forensic Haemogenetics book series (HAEMOGENETICS, volume 5)

Abstract

Microsatellite loci (VNTR, Variable Number of Tandem Repeats), a highly polymorphic system of non-coding marker loci dispersed throughout the whole human genome with constant rates were introduced to paternity and identity testing by Jeffreys et al (1988). Initially, typing has been carried out by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP). Since this method has its limitaions and moreover, is time-consuming and difficult to perform and to analyze, typing by Amplification Fragment Length Polymorphism (AMPFLP, Budowle et al 1991) represents a major improvement to the typing of VNTR-loci. Since this is a simple and reliable technique and sufficently high exclusion chances can easily be achieved, it will presumably replace conventional systems for paternity and identity testing in the near future. Population and family studies that are necessary to select and to introduce new marker systems to forensic haemogenetics have already been performed by a number of workers(see Lit.). In this paper, we present the allele and phenotype frequencies of an Austrian population sample typed for the VNTR-loci ApoB, COL2A1, D1S80 and YNZ22.

Keywords

Electrophoresis Polyacrylamide Lissencephaly 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. W. M. Schwartz
    • 1
  • E. M. Jungl
    • 1
  • O. R. Krenek
    • 1
  • W. R. Mayr
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Institute for Blood Group Serology and Transfusion MedicineUniversity of ViennaAustria

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