Analysis by PCR/Oligonucleotide Typing of HLA Class II Alleles in a Variety of Human Populations

  • H. A. Erlich
  • T. L. Bugawan
  • R. Apple
  • E. Titus
  • R. Castro
  • P. Moonsamy
  • A. B. Begovich
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Forensic Haemogenetics book series (HAEMOGENETICS, volume 5)

Abstract

The analysis of allele frequency distributions in various human populations can provide valuable anthropologic genetics information as well as useful data for forensics inferences about identity. One of the more controversial issues in the area of forensic inference, has been the question of population substructure and how this might effect the calculations of statistical weight (i.e., likelihood of a “random match”) associated with an inclusionary result. The issue of substructure within the so-called census populations and the possibility that different subpopulations can have significantly different allele frequencies can be addressed most directly by determining the allele frequencies in many different population groups.

Keywords

Migration Codon Colombia Ecuador 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. A. Erlich
    • 1
  • T. L. Bugawan
    • 1
  • R. Apple
    • 1
  • E. Titus
    • 1
  • R. Castro
    • 1
  • P. Moonsamy
    • 1
  • A. B. Begovich
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Genetics Dept.Roche Molecular SystemsAlamedaUSA

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