The Size of Polymer Molecules — Mean Values and Distributions of the Molecular Weight

  • Frieder Francuskiewicz
Part of the Springer Lab Manual book series (SLM)

Abstract

The size of a macromolecule can be described by the molecular weight (MW) M as well as by the degree of polymerization (DP) P. Both quantities are related according to
$$ M = {M_{0}} \cdot P $$
(10.1)
where M 0 represents the MW of the repeat unit. Mostly, one applies MW to characterize the size of macromolecules but sometimes use of DP is advantageous, e.g., in the comparison of molecular size before and after a polymer-analogous reaction.

Keywords

Acetone Fractionation Ketone Vinyl Macromolecule 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frieder Francuskiewicz
    • 1
  1. 1.Forschungsstelle Dr. Kubsch, Laboratorium für Analytik, Radiometrie und Umwelttechnologie GmbHFARUDresdenGermany

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