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Role of Pharmacokinetics in Drug Discovery and Development

  • P. G. Welling
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 110)

Abstract

Compared to other disciplines involved in drug discovery and development, with the possible exception of biotechnology, pharmacokinetics is a relative newcomer. If one delves into the literature one can find early articles that relate to the subject matter. For example, in 1847 Buchanan related depth of narcosis to brain content and arterial concentrations of anesthetics, while in the same year, Snow (1847) commented on the need to regulate the strength of medicinal compounds. However, these were early days, and preceded the introduction of analytical technology and the intellectual maturation necessary for the study of pharmacokinetics in its present form.

Keywords

Drug Discovery Drug Candidate Toxicity Species Preclinical Development Clinical Development Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. Welling

There are no affiliations available

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