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Der anabole Stoffwechsel des Chloroplasten

  • Helmut Kindl
Part of the Springer-Lehrbuch book series (SLB)

Zusammenfassung

Ein photoautotropher Organismus wird durch die Funktion des Chloroplasten ernährt. Die Bereitstellung von ATP und NADPH durch lichtabhängige ET-Ketten ist die Voraussetzung für die weiteren Aktivitäten des Chloroplasten. Er stellt durch Photoassimilierung Zwischenstufen und Kohlenhydrate her, reduziert Stickstoff-Verbindungen auf die Stufe von Aminen und Schwefel auf die Stufe von Sulfid. Darüber hinaus hat sich der Chloroplast — fast wie ein richtiger Prokaryont — die Fähigkeit erhalten, Stoffwechselwege autonom durchzuführen, etwa die Lipid- und Aminosäure-Synthesen.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helmut Kindl
    • 1
  1. 1.Fachbereich Chemie, BiochemiePhilipps-Universität MarburgMarburgGermany

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