Advertisement

Allelic Polymorphyism in Toxoplasma Gondii Implications for Interstrain Mating

  • John C. Boothroyd
  • Allen J. LeBlanc
  • L. David Sibley
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 78)

Abstract

The life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii is complex with several alternative subcycles. It can, for example, pass from cat to cat through an oral-faecal route, each time going through a sexual cycle in the intestine of the cat. This subcycle can be considered to begin with excretion of highly stable oocysts in the faeces of an infected cat. Upon maturation, these oocysts will contain two sporocysts, each comprising four sporozoites. Transmission occurs when the mature oocysts are ingested by another cat with release of the sporozoites in the intestine. These invade the intestinal epithelium where they divide intracellularly, ultimately differentiating into either micro- or macro-gametes. Fusion of the two gametes gives rise to the zygote which develops into the immature oocyst. The cycle is completed upon release of these oocysts into the environment. Felidae is the only genus known in which gametogenesis and oocyst production occurs.

Keywords

Virulent Strain Sexual Cycle Tissue Cyst Virulent Line Oocyst Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Sibley LD, Boothroyd JC (1992) Virulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii are clonal. Nature (in press).Google Scholar
  2. Sibley LD, LeBlanc A, Pfefferkorn ER, Boothroyd JC (1992) Generation of a restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage map for Toxoplasma gondii. (submitted).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John C. Boothroyd
    • 1
  • Allen J. LeBlanc
    • 1
  • L. David Sibley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyStandford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

Personalised recommendations