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Macrophage Activity, Fibronectin, and SPARC Protein in Experimentally Induced Granuloma

  • S. Shoshan
  • I. Babayof
  • I. Peleg
  • F. Grinnell
  • N. Ron
  • S. Funk
  • E. H. Sage
Conference paper

Abstract

Repair of injured tissue is a sequence of events in which cells with distinct functions are attached to the wound, proliferate, and secrete extracellular matrix material to finally restore structure and function.

Keywords

Granulation Tissue Macrophage Activity Latex Bead Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cell Excision Wound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Shoshan
  • I. Babayof
  • I. Peleg
  • F. Grinnell
  • N. Ron
  • S. Funk
  • E. H. Sage

There are no affiliations available

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