Destruction of Gaseous Pollutants and Air Toxics by Surface Discharge Induced Plasma Chemical Process (SPCP) and Pulse Corona Induced Plasma Chemical Process (PPCP)

  • S. Masuda
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 34)

Abstract

Both Surface Discharge Induced Plasma Chemical Process (SPCP) and Pulse Corona Induced Plasma Chemical Process (PPCP) generate highly non-equilibrium cold plasma in atmospheric pressure, with a very high electron temperature and ordinary ion/molecular temperature (Masuda 1990; Masuda 1991). These two modes of discharge, although seemingly quite different, are essentially based on Nanosecond Pulse Discharge which have unique features of realizing such cold plasma in gases under NPT, and they can generate copious active radicals. As a result, control of gaseous pollutants becomes possible by converting them into solid particulate (e.g. Hg-vapor into HgO or HgCl2), gas-to-liquid conversion (control of SO2 by converting into SO3 and further into H2SO4 droplets), and of course, gas-to-gas conversion (NO to NO2 or to N2 and O2, decomposition of freons, trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, toluene and many other air toxics).

Keywords

Combustion Dust Sulfide Mercury Ozone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Masuda
    • 1
  1. 1.Masuda Research, Inc.Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113Japan

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