Lipoprotein Metabolism

  • H. B. Brewer
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 109)

Abstract

Plasma lipids are transported by lipoproteins composed of several classes of lipids (including cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids) and proteins designated apolipoproteins. Our understanding of the role of lipoproteins and apolipoproteins in lipid transport has markedly increased over the last two decades. The roles of lipoprotein receptors, enzymes, and apolipoproteins in lipoprotein metabolism have been elucidated, and this new information provides a conceptual framework for the understanding of lipid transport in normal subjects and dyslipoproteinemic patients.

Keywords

Cholesterol Hydrolysis Foam Cysteine Arginine 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

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  • H. B. Brewer

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