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Clinical Implications

  • Joachim Chrubasik
  • Sigrun Chrubasik
  • Laurence Mather

Abstract

To achieve effective epidural opioid analgesia, a critical mass or amount of opioid must be injected into the epidural space. A further increase in that dose does not materially shorten the onset time of analgesia. For example, the onset times of analgesia following epidural administration of 2, 4 or 8 mg morphine for management of pain after orthopedic surgery do not differ significantly. These doses also produce analgesia of equal quality. The quality of analgesia after epidural injection of 0.5 or 1 mg morphine, however, is significantly inferior (Martin et al. 1982).

Keywords

Opioid Receptor Respiratory Depression Epidural Analgesia Epidural Space Epidural Morphine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joachim Chrubasik
    • 1
  • Sigrun Chrubasik
    • 2
  • Laurence Mather
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyUniversity HospitalHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Department of Forensic MedicineUniversity HospitalFreiburgGermany
  3. 3.Department of Anesthesia Royal North Shore HospitalUniversity of SydneySt. LeonardsAustralia

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