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Socio-Economic Options for the Management of the Exploitation of Intertidal and Subtidal Resources

  • F. J. Odendaal
  • M. O. Bergh
  • G. M. Branch
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 103)

Abstract

Fishing has for centuries been an important industry for many countries bordering the sea. In recent years, however, the combined effect of human population growth and technological innovation has led to dramatic increases in fishing pressure, with consequent reductions and collapses of many major offshore marine resources. One consequence of this is that market opportunities for inshore resources, particularly sub- and intertidal resources, have flourished, notably in such oriental countries as Japan. Very high prices are obtained for squid, octopus, abalone, sea urchins, limpets and various species of algae. As a result, the exploitation of previously overlooked resources has now become economically viable (see Dethier et al. 1989).

Keywords

Fishery Management Fishery Science Marine Resource Marine Reserve Social Feedback 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. J. Odendaal
  • M. O. Bergh
  • G. M. Branch

There are no affiliations available

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