Sources, Nature and Levels of Indoor Air Pollutants

  • Lawrence Fishbein
  • Kari Hemminki
Conference paper
Part of the Monographs book series (ESO MONOGRAPHS)

Abstract

There is increasing recognition that the indoor air environment may play a critical role in regard to the scope of exposure of an individual to a broad spectrum of constituents (chemical, physical and microbial), a number of which, either individually or in complex mixtures, are carcinogenic (e.g., radon-222, asbestos, formaldehyde, environmental tobacco smoke) or may have other toxicological significance [1–27]. This facet is underscored by summaries of human activity pattern studies which indicate that, over the last 2 decades, individuals spend the majority of their time indoors. In the modern industrialised societies, employed individuals spend approximately 60% of their day at home, 30% at work and 5% in transit [10,11].Typical figures of time spent indoors range from 60–75% [8,10–13], to nearly 90% for employed men and 95% for homemakers [1,2,4,8–10,14]. Although there are many different micro-environments such as offices, public buildings, schools, private vehicles and public transport, approximately 75% of the time spent indoors is spent at home [4,8].

Keywords

Combustion Benzene Styrene Bismuth Monit 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence Fishbein
    • 1
  • Kari Hemminki
    • 2
  1. 1.Office of Toxicology SciencesCenter for Food Safety and Nutrition, Food and Drug AdministrationWashington, D.CUSA
  2. 2.Centre for Nutrition and ToxicologyCNT NovumHuddingeSweden

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