A Case Report Illustrating the Brain-Stem Anatomy of Horizontal Eye Movements

  • K. Tiel-Wilck
  • T. Lempert
  • J. Schultes
Conference paper

Abstract

A 31-year-old man developed postural imbalance and 3 days later a horizontal gaze palsy to the left. He was unable to perform saccadic, pursuit, or vestibular eye movements beyond the midline to the left. Saccades from the right back to the midposition were slightly slowed. There was a gazeevoked nystagmus to the right. Simultaneously with the oculomotor abnormalities, a left-sided infranuclear facial palsy with preserved taste and lacrimal secretion appeared.

Keywords

Neurol Ophthalmoplegia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Tiel-Wilck
    • 1
  • T. Lempert
    • 1
  • J. Schultes
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung für NeurologieUniversitätsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany

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