Secular Gravity Variations

  • A. Kopaev
Conference paper
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 112)

Abstract

Detailed analysis of repeated absolute gravity determinations that have been carried out during last 15 years using ballistic gravimeters at stations located in Europe (Potsdam, Sèvres), and Northern America (Denver) permits to suspect the existence of global gravity variations with amplitudes of about 30–40 microgal which seem to be correlated with long-term changes in the earth rotation speed.

Keywords

Europe 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Kopaev
    • 1
  1. 1.Astronomical Institute of Moscow UniversityMoscowRussia

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