Circumventricular Organs and Modulation in the Midsagittal Plane of the Brain

  • H. Leonhardt
  • B. Krisch
Conference paper

Abstract

The phylogenetically persistent circumventricular organs (CVOs) develop in the midsagittal plane at those sites of the prosencephalic vesicle where the prospective brain will remain thin-walled. The anlagen of the CVOs develop in this plane free from influences from the telencephalic vesicles and their developmental transformations. Only the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricles follow the developing telencephalon, extending in the form of a ram’s horn.

Keywords

Permeability Respiration Retina Angiotensin Neurol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Leonhardt
  • B. Krisch

There are no affiliations available

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