Transformation in Lobelia inflata

  • Masahiko Tanaka
  • Hiroshi Yonemitsu
  • Koichiro Shimomura
  • Kanji Ishimaru
  • Shunji Mochida
  • Tohru Edno
  • Akira Kaji
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 22)

Abstract

Lobelia inflata L. (Campanulaceae) is an annual plant with an erect, angular, slightly pubescent stem of up to 50 cm. It is commonly known as Indian tobacco, since it is used as a substitute for tobacco by American Indians. Several dialkylpiperidine alkaloids have been isolated from this plant (Schöpf and Kauffmann 1957). The total alkaloid content of L. inflata was found to be 0.134–0.635%, and the quantity of alkaloid varies with the culture conditions (Kalashnikov 1939).

Keywords

Nicotine Pyridine Alkaloid Glycoside Diol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masahiko Tanaka
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Yonemitsu
    • 1
  • Koichiro Shimomura
    • 2
  • Kanji Ishimaru
    • 3
  • Shunji Mochida
    • 1
  • Tohru Edno
    • 1
  • Akira Kaji
    • 4
  1. 1.Research Institute for Molecular GeneticsTsumura & Co.Ami-machi, Inashiki, IbarakiJapan
  2. 2.Tsukuba Medicinal Plant Research StationNational Institute of Hygienic SciencesTsukuba, Ibaraki 305Japan
  3. 3.Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Faculty of AgricultureSaga UniversityHonjo, Saga, 840Japan
  4. 4.Department of Microbiology, School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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