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Therapy and Prognosis in Spontaneous Cerebellar Hematomas

  • U. Neubauer
  • B. Schwenk
Part of the Advances in Neurosurgery book series (NEURO, volume 21)

Abstract

Cerebellar hematomas threaten patients in a twofold way: first, by the local mass in the posterior fossa which may cause a significant brain stem compression and, second, by the concomitant hydrocephalus in many patients with increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in the supratentorial space [4, 5, 8] (Fig. 1). For the treatment of cerebellar hematomas we have three options: (a) evacuation of the hematoma by a posterior fossa approach [1–3], (b) CSF drainage by a frontal burr hole to control the hydrocephalus and ICP [6,10], and (c) conservative treatment only. Criteria for the decision as to how to treat the individual patient may be the size of the hematoma [9] and the patient’s clinical condition [7].

Keywords

Glasgow Coma Scale Posterior Fossa Cerebellar Hemorrhage Left Cerebellar Hemisphen Brain Stem Compression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Neubauer
    • 1
  • B. Schwenk
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurochirurgische KlinikUniversität Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany

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