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Architectural Foundations for Real-Time Performance in Intelligent Agents

  • Barbara Hayes-Roth

Abstract

Intelligent agents perform concurrent tasks requiring interaction with a dynamic environment, under real-time constraints. Because an agent’s opportunities to perceive, reason, and act exceed its resources, it must determine which operations to perform and when to perform them so as to achieve its most important objectives. Accordingly, we view the problem of real-time performance as a problem in intelligent real-time control. We propose control requirements and present an agent architecture designed to address them. Key features include: parallel perception, action, and cognition processes, limitedcapacity I/O buffers with best-first retrieval and worst-first overflow, dynamic control planning, dynamic focus of attention, and a satisficing execution cycle. These features allow an agent to trade quality for speed of response under dynamic goals, resource limitations, and performance constraints. We illustrate the architecture in the Guardian system for intensive care monitoring and contrast it with alternative architectures.

Keywords

Intelligent Agent Global Memory Control Decision Output Buffer Reasoning Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Hayes-Roth
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityPalo AltoUSA

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