Advertisement

Strategies of Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts in Wound Closure Observed in an In Vitro Model

  • S. Kippenberger
  • F. Görmar
  • A. Bernd
  • A. Ramirez
  • C. Theilig
  • D. Henrich
  • J. Stitz
  • J. Bereiter-Hahn
  • H. Holzmann
Conference paper

Abstract

One of the most important functions of the integument is to maintain internal homeostasis and protect the organism from the entry of pathogens. So it is essential for any organism to repair this basic structure after an injury. Experimental investigations on wound closure are rendered difficult by technical and structural problems related to the complex microenvironment of a healing wound. Various models have been established; these reduce the complexity but consider only a few of the aspects in wound healing, for example, stripping of epidermis (e.g., Christophers 1973), suction-induced subepidermal blisters (Krawczyk 1971, 1973), or the rabbit ear chamber (Clark and Clark 1953).

Keywords

Wound Closure Skin Sample Book Medical Publisher Cell Species Model Wound Healing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Christophers E (1973) Kinetic aspects of epidermal healing. In: Maibach HI, Rovee DT (eds) Epidermal wound healing. Year Book Medical Publishers, Chicago, pp 53–69.Google Scholar
  2. Clark ER, Clark EL (1953) Growth and behavior of epidermis as observed microscopically in observation chambers inserted in ears of rabbits. Am J Anat 93:171–219.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Krawczyk WS (1971) A pattern of epidermal cell migration during wound healing. J Cell Biol 49:247–263.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Krawczyk WS (1973) Some ultrastructural aspects of epidermal repair in two model wound healing systems. In: Maibach HI, Rovee DT (eds) Epidermal wound healing. Year Book Medical Publishers, Chicago, pp 27–48.Google Scholar
  5. Pinnel S, Murad S, Darr D (1987) Induction of collagen synthesis by ascorbic acid. A possible mechanism. Arch Dermatol 123:1684–1686.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Pruckop DJ, Kivirikko KI, Tuderman L, Guzman N (1979) Biosynthesis of collagen and its disorders. N Engl J Med 301:13–23, 77-85CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Kippenberger
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Görmar
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Bernd
    • 1
  • A. Ramirez
    • 1
  • C. Theilig
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Henrich
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Stitz
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Bereiter-Hahn
    • 2
  • H. Holzmann
    • 2
  1. 1.UniversitätshautklinikJ.W. Goethe UniversitätFrankfurtGermany
  2. 2.AK Kinematische ZellforschungFrankfurtGermany

Personalised recommendations