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Platelet Released Factors Stimulate Rat Burn Wound Contraction

  • S. J. H. Kendall
  • J. Hart
  • M. Dyson
  • I. McColl
Conference paper

Abstract

After thermal injury fluctuations in blood platelet levels have been reported. Eurenius et al. (1972) found that when 30% full-thickness burn wounds were induced in rats, a thrombocytopenia occurred within the first few hours of injury followed by a thrombocythaemia which reached a maximum between 3–5 days. Similar blood platelet level fluctuations have been observed in humans, albeit with a more prolonged time course (Baxter 1974).

Keywords

Thermal Injury Human Dermal Fibroblast Wound Contraction Wilcoxon Rank Test Fibroblast Migration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. H. Kendall
    • 1
  • J. Hart
    • 2
  • M. Dyson
    • 2
  • I. McColl
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryGuy’s HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.The Tissue Repair Research UnitU.M.D.S. Guy’s Hospital CampusLondonUK

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