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Hyperdocuments as user interfaces: Exploring a browsing semantic for coherent hyperdocuments

  • Jörg Hannemann
  • Manfred Thüring
  • Norbert Friedrich
Conference paper
Part of the Informatik aktuell book series (INFORMAT)

Abstract

For moving hypertext out of the labs into a wide-spread use, it is crucial to improve the quality of its on-line presentation. To reach this goal, it is not sufficient to concentrate on navigation and neglect support for better comprehension. Improving the understanding of a hyperdocument can be accomplished by imposing a coherent structure on the document and by conveying it to the reader. In this paper, we describe an approach which follows this idea: Based on a construction kit for coherent hyperdocuments, we have developed a user interface which combines the presentation of structure and content with additional orientation cues and facilities for comfortable navigation. Using a prototypical hyperdocument as an example, this browsing semantic is explained and its impact on comprehension and navigation is dicussed.

Keywords

Rhetorik of hypertext coherence of hyperdocuments user interface design browsing semantic comprehension and navigation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jörg Hannemann
    • 1
  • Manfred Thüring
    • 1
  • Norbert Friedrich
    • 1
  1. 1.Gesellschaft für Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung (GMD)Integrated Publication and Information Systems Institute (IPSI)DarmstadtGermany

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