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Lymphohaematopoietic Growth Factor Use in Lung Cancer Patients

  • N. Thatcher
Conference paper
Part of the ESO Monographs book series (ESO MONOGRAPHS)

Abstract

The haematopoietic colony stimulating factors (CSFs) are glycoproteins that were found to stimulate and promote the proliferation of granulocyte and monocyte progenitor cells on semi-solid media in clonogenic assays (Table 1) [1]. The complex process of haematopoiesis is controlled by the diverse but intergrated actions of the CSFs, their target cells and stroma. Although CSFs are mainly noted for their proliferation and differentiation activities, other important aspects of their function include maintenance of cell viability, membrane integrity and functional stimulation of mature cells, e.g., granulocyte phagocytosis, superoxide production etc. (Table 2) [2]. Besides the CSFs a variety of other factors such as erythropoietin and interleukins (ILs) also have important effects on proliferation and differentiation of target cells.

Keywords

Small Cell Lung Cancer Lung Cancer Patient Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Thatcher
    • 1
  1. 1.CRC Department of Medical OncologyChristie Hospital NHS TrustManchesterUK

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