Comparison of Thiopentone and Propofol at Two Rates of Intravenous Administration in Severely Head Injured Patients

  • P. J. D. Andrews
  • N. M. Dearden
  • J. D. Miller
Conference paper

Abstract

During intensive care management of severely head injured patients undergoing IPPV sedation may be administered, to obtund paroxysmal ICP rises during therapeutic manoeuvres, and to treat persistently elevated ICP. The recently reintroduced intravenous anaesthetic, 2, 6 di-isopropyl phenol (Propofol), has attracted attention as a sedative in ICU both for general critical care patients and head injured patients [1, 3]. Propofol causes a decrease in CBF and CBV and is therefore of potential value in treatment of intracranial hypertension after severe head injury [6, 8]. However, there is concern that CBF is reduced more than CMR resulting in desaturation of cerebral venous blood [7, 8].

Keywords

Phenol Syringe Thiopental Thiopentone Dmax 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. D. Andrews
    • 1
  • N. M. Dearden
    • 2
  • J. D. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.University Departments of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General HospitalUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghScotland
  2. 2.University Departments of Anaesthesia, Western General HospitalUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghScotland

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