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Instructional Systems Need Instructional Theory: Comments on a Truism

  • Marlene Jones
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 96)

Abstract

Developers of Artificial Intelligence (AI) -based instructional software have not yet paid a sufficient amount of attention to the instructional capabilities of such systems. In this paper, we briefly discuss candidate theories of instructional design with the goal of convincing the reader that there do exist instructional theories with which developers of Al-based instructional software should be familiar. We also investigate what additional information is required to supplement such theories, and suggest directions for future research and development.

Keywords

ACT* cognitive diagnosis cognitive processes cognitive skills component display theory design theory expert system goal lattice inquiry teaching instructional design instructional theory intelligent computer-assisted instruction intelligent tutoring Systems ITS knowledge elicitation techniques learning hierarchies learning outcome motivation PEDAGOGUE routines schemata sequencing sequencing strategy snowball method Structured Learning Theory subject matter analysis tacit knowledge task analysis think-aloud protocol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marlene Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Alberta Research CouncilAdvanced TechnologiesCalgaryCanada

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