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GPS Orbit/Clock Estimation Based on Smoothed Pseudorange Data from a Ten-Station Global Network

  • Everett R. Swift
Conference paper
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 109)

Abstract

In August of 1987, the Naval Surface Warfare Center began computing precise GPS ephemeris and clock estimates using smoothed pseudorange data from a global ten-station network. This network consists of the five U.S. Air Force monitor stations and the five tracking sites deployed by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA). Generation of the precise ephemeris and clock estimates was transitioned to DMA in July 1989 for the Block I satellites and in January 1990 for the Block II satellites. All estimates have been generated using a multisatellite Kalifian filter/ smoother software system that can process up to seven satellites simultaneously. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the processing procedures originally adopted, the improvements made over the years, and the results obtained through the end of 1990. This will include a discussion of the accuracy of the Earth orientation parameters derived from GPS.

Keywords

Global Position System Satellite Clock Earth Orientation Parameter Earth Orientation Clock Estimate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Fliegel, H., Swift E., and Gallini, T. (1991). Global Positioning System Radiation Force Model for Geodetic Applications, accepted for publication in J. Geophys. Res.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Everett R. Swift
    • 1
  1. 1.Space and Geodesy Branch (K12) Naval Surface Systems DivisionNaval Surface Warfare CenterDahlgrenUSA

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