Introductory Remarks

  • Roger L. Simpson
Conference paper

Abstract

The papers selected to appear in this section represent a cross-section of current research activities on separated flows: laser Doppler anemometer measurements of highly three-dimensional separations around and over obstacles and bodies that may have large mean vortical regions; large-eddy simulations (LES) with subgrid-scale modeling of separated flows dominated by the behavior of the larger structures; calculations using Reynolds-averaged equations and several closure models to assess their relative performance as compared to data for complex separated flows.

Keywords

Vortex Vorticity 

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References

  1. Devenport, W.J. and Simpson, R.L. (1990) “Time-Dependent and Time-Averaged Turbulence Structure Near the Nose of a Wing-Body Junction”, J. Fluid Mech., 210, pp. 23–55, 1990.Google Scholar
  2. Ölçmen, S.M. and Simpson, R.L. (1992) “Influence of Wing Shapes on the Surface Pressure Fluctuations of a Wing-Body Junction”, AIAA-92–0433, 30th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV., Jan. 6–9.Google Scholar
  3. Simpson, R.L. (1985) “Two-Dimensional Turbulent Separated Flow”, AGARD-AG-287-Vo1.1, NATO-AGARD.Google Scholar
  4. Simpson, R.L. (1986) “A Review of Two-Dimensional Turbulent Separated Flow Calculation Methods”, IUTAM Symposium on Boundary Layer Separation, London, August 1986; proceeding, pp. 179–196, 1987, Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  5. Thwaites, B. (1960) Incompressible Aerodynamics, Oxford Univ. Press; first Dover Edition, 1987.MATHGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger L. Simpson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Aerospace and Ocean EngineeringVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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