The Economics of the Atlantic Slave Trade

  • M. Ali Khan

Abstract

Trout J. Rader III is an economist with an impressive range. He is unique among mathematical economists in terms of his interests in the Protestant ethic1 and in the economics of feudalism and slavery, 2 and unique among development economists in terms of his reliance on rigorous economic theory and in the importance he gives to purely technical issues such as, for example, the differentiability of solutions to general optimization problems and to the properties of preference relations.3 As such, his work can be looked on and admired from many angles. In this essay, I follow Trout Rader the development economist, and taking Chapter 2 of his book on The Economics of Feudalism as an example and guide, propose a model of the Atlantic slave trade. The methodology behind my work can be stated best in Rader’s own words.

Keywords

Sugar Migration Europe Shipping Income 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ali Khan
    • 1
  1. 1.The Johns Hopkins UniversityItaly

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