Transrectal Hyperthermia in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

  • P. Van Erps
  • L. J. Denis
Conference paper

Abstract

Hyperthermia, or abnormally high temperature of the human body or parts of it, has been induced artifically to promote healing since ancient times. The antitumor effect of heat was first reported by Busch in 1866, who noted that a histologically confirmed sarcoma regressed in a patient following an attack of high fever caused by erysipelas. It has been clearly established that controlled elevation of temperature to the hyperthermic range of 42°–45°C can selectively damage malignant tissue, while leaving surrounding normal tissue unharmed. Although there are many theories concerning the sensitivity of tumor cells to heating, the most important factor is probably defective heat dissipation by neoplastic tissue that occurs as a result of poor blood supply and decreased vasodilation capacity of the neovascular bed in response to thermal load. Tissue overheating causes extensive local cellular damage [1]. A synergistic effect has been shown between hyperthermia and radiotherapy as well as between hyperthermia and several chemo-therapeutic agents [2,3].

Keywords

Placebo Catheter Microwave Ureum Creatinine 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Song CWX (1978) Effects of hyperthermia on vascular functions of normal tissues and experimental tumors. J N CI 60:711–713Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Robinson JE, Wizenberg MJ (1974) Thermal sensitivity and the effect of elevated temperatures on the radiation sensitivity of Chinese hamster cells. Acta Radiol Ther 13:241–248Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Marmor JB (1979) Interactions of hyperthermia and chemotherapy in animals. Cancer Res 39:2269–2276PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Yerushalmi A, Shpirer Z, Hod I, Gottesfeld F, Bass DD (1982) Normal tissue response to localized deep microwave hyperthermia in the rabbit’s prostate: a preclinical study. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 9:77–82Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Leib Z, Rothem A, Lev A, Servadio C (1986) Histopathological observations in the canine prostate treated by local microwave hyperthermia. Prostate 8:93–102PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Yerushalmi A, Servadio C, Leib Z, Fishelovitz Y, Rokowsky E, Stein JA (1982) Local hyperthermia for treatment of carcinoma of the prostate: a preliminary report. Prostate 6:623CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Yerushalmi A, Fishelovitz Y, Singer D, Reiner I, Arielly J, Abramovici Y et al. (1985) Localized deep microwave hyperthermia in the treatment of poor operative risk patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. J Urol 133:873–876PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Servadio C, Leib Z, Lev A (1986) Further observations on the use of local hyperthermia for the treatment of diseases of the prostate. Eur Urol 12:38–40PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Servadio C, Leib Z, Lev A (1987) Diseases of prostate treated by local microwave hyperthermia. Urology 30:97–99PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Servadio C, Lev A, Leib Z (1988) Local hyperthermia for the treatment of diseases of the prostate. J Urol 139:484AGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Lindner A, Golomb J, Siegel Y, Lev A (1987) Local hyperthermia of the prostate gland for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy and urinary retention: a preliminary report. Br J Urol 60:567–571PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Yerushalmi A (1988) Localized, non-invasive deep microwave hyperthermia for the treatment of prostatic tumors: the first 5 Years. Recent Results Cancer Res 107:141–146PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Blandy J (1986) The history and current problems of benign prostatic obstruction in the prostate. Butterworths, London, pp 12–22Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Mebust WK, Holtgrewe HL, Cockett ATK et al. (1989) Transurethral prostatectomy: immediate and postoperative complications: a cooperative study of 13 participating institutions evaluating 3885 patients. J Urol 141:243PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Fowler FJ, Wennberg JE, Timothy RP et al. (1988) Symptom status and quality of life following prostatectomy. JAMA 259:3018PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Dowd JB, Smith JJ (1990) Balloon dilation of the prostate. Urol Clin North Am 17:671PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Chappie C, Milroy EJ, Rickards D (1990) Permanently implanted urethral stent for prostatic obstruction in the unfit patient: preliminary report. Br J Urol 66:58CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Caine M (1990) Alpha-adrenergic blockers for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Urol Clin North Am 17:641PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    McConnell JD (1990) Androgen blockade in the treatment of benign prostic hyperplasia. Urol Clin North Am 17:661PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Lindner A, Braf Z, Lev A et al. (1990) Local hyperthermia of the prostate gland for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy and urinary retention. Br J Urol 65:201PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Lindner A, Golomb J, Siegal Y, Lev A (1987) Local hyperthermia of the prostate gland for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy and urinary retention: a preliminary report. Br J Urol 60:567PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Saranga R, Matzkin H, Braf Z (1990) Local microwave hyperthermia of the prostate gland in the treatment of benign prostic hypertrophy. Br J Urol 65:349PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Ball AJ, Feneley RCL, Abrams PH (1981) The natural history of untreated ”prostatism“. Br J Urol 53:613PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Van Erps
  • L. J. Denis
    • 1
  1. 1.Algemeen Ziekenhuis MiddelheimAntwerpenBelgium

Personalised recommendations